Can Foxes See Magnetic North

Do foxes really have the ability to see magnetic north? Some people believe that they do while others think it’s just a myth. So what’s the truth?

Do foxes really have the ability to see magnetic north? Some people believe that they do while others think it’s just a myth. So what’s the truth?

According to some researchers foxes are able to see magnetic north because of a special light-sensitive protein called cryptochrome that’s found in their eyes.

This protein is believed to interact with the Earth’s magnetic field which would allow foxes to orient themselves and navigate by using thefield lines.

While there’s no concrete evidence that foxes can actually see magnetic north there have been some interesting studies that seem to support this claim. For example one study found that foxes tended to urinate in a north-south line which could be an indication that they were aligning themselves with the magnetic field.

So while we can’t say for sure whether or not foxes can see magnetic north it’s definitely a possibility. If you’re ever lost in the woods maybe you should ask a fox for directions!

What is the name for the Earth’s natural satellite?

The Moon

Which planet has the most moons?

Jupiter

What is the name of the galaxy in which the Earth is located?

The Milky Way

Who was the first person to walk on the Moon?

Neil Armstrong

Who was the first person in space?

Yuri Gagarin

What is the name of the longest river in Africa?

The Nile

What is the name of the tallest mountain in the solar system?

Olympus Mons

What is the name of the largest desert on Earth?

The Sahara

What is the name of the coldest place on Earth?

Antarctica

What is the name of the hottest place on Earth?

Death Valley

What is the name of the windiest place on Earth?

Mount Washington

What is the name of the largest ocean on Earth?

The Pacific

What is the name of the deepest ocean on Earth?

The Mariana Trench

What percent of the Earth is covered in water?

About 71%

What is the name of the only natural satellite of the planet Mercury?

Messenger.

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John.E Nelson

J.E Nelson has written about foxes on occassions more than one, and the works are being enjoyed by many readers over the world. He was formerly of the Zoology Department, University of Queensland Australia, and now at the Department of Zoology and Comparative Physiology, Monach University, Victoria.

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